Blog

Dandelion Fritters and The Importance of Ingesting Your Landscape

Dandelion Fritters and The Importance of Ingesting Your Landscape

by Kat Mackinnon, CSCH Faculty This time of year, my whole being begins to whisper, and eventually scream “wild greens!” Like many, I’m blessed with yearlong access to produce at the grocery store.  But by early spring, I crave the freshness of my garden and the pungent tang of wild-gathered foods. Strolling in the veggie section the other day, I overheard two women speaking: “Oh I just can’t wait for fresh tomatoes!” This urge, this desire for vital foods is a near universal human trait, and one worth cultivating. There is real...

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Dandelion and its Constituents

Dandelion and its Constituents

By Lisa Ganora, CSCH Director Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) root & leaf Energetics: cool and dry; bitter tonic, vital stimulant, with some relaxant character Actions: alterative, nutritive, bitter tonic, hepatic and digestive stimulant, diuretic (especially the leaf). Flowers: nutritive, trophorestorative, systemic protective against free radical damage and chronic inflammation The versatile Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) has many actions, including being an alterative and trophorestorative. ‘Alterative’ is a historical term that...

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On Psychospiritual Healing and Flower Essences

On Psychospiritual Healing and Flower Essences

By Paul Bergner, NAIMH Director & CSCH Faculty During the early 1980s, practicing in New Haven CT, I began to study and eventually to teach Bach Flower Remedies. In my practice at the time, I was running into a wall, with clients, family members, and also myself. What is going on when someone is suffering, and they positively know what will relieve that suffering, but they cannot do what is necessary? This is “karma,” “maya” and a recognized spiritual problem throughout all spiritual disciplines. Something is fixed...

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The Garden of Our Microbiome

The Garden of Our Microbiome

by Amy Jones, Certified Herbalist Bacteria usually get a bad rap in our modern culture.  Some are, after all, cause for many illnesses; but the other side of the bacterial equation is that we actually need certain kinds to thrive and stay healthy. Did you know that the amount of beneficial bacteria in the body can weigh anywhere from 2 to 6 pounds?  With that much bacterial activity going on inside of us, there must be a reason! In recent years, science has begun to uncover what traditional healers have known for centuries – that the...

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Herbal Medicinal Meads

Herbal Medicinal Meads

by Lisa Ganora, CSCH Director Mead is an ancient drink made by fermenting honey with yeast. Technically, if you add fruits to the mix, you have melomel; if you add spices, it’s called metheglin. Generally, though, I just call it all mead. Chemical traces of fermented honey have been found in 9,000-year-old Chinese pottery vessels, and in Scandinavia it has been made for generations (hence the title of the popular new book, Make Mead like a Viking). Today mead is enjoying new popularity – especially when well-crafted and not...

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Anima Mundi: At Home in the Soul of the World

Anima Mundi: At Home in the Soul of the World

by Joshua Paquette, CSCH Faculty Robert Bly once noted that after World War II we in the West began to lose our sense of aesthetic unity — eros and ethos — the love and care inherent in things. Buildings gradually displayed less character and charm; increasingly, up went the sky scrapers and tall glass sentinels of our modern cities. Schools, libraries and public buildings went from creaking hardwood floors, mysterious nooks and cathedral ceilings to clean lines, rubber baseboard, and central heating. Modern and post-modern architecture...

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Red Clover “Meatballs”

Red Clover “Meatballs”

I first learned a version of this recipe from an herbalist, nurse and Adirondack homesteader, the late Linda Runyon. A vegetarian at the time, she said she was getting tired of having to hike into town to get their supply of meat. One summer day, she decided not to make the trip. That’s when she got the idea to use Red Clover flowers in place of meatballs for their next dinner (her husband and son, both avid meat eaters, were none the wiser). When she set out dinner that night, there were a lot of ‘hmms’ and ‘yums’, though a few...

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Into The Honeycomb

Into The Honeycomb

An Exploration into the Magical World of the Honeybee Honeybees have been called the heart of our biosphere through the work they do in facilitating life on this planet. Pollinators as a whole perform a crucial mission on behalf of all life through facilitating the reproduction of flowering plants. Today honeybees are responsible for a third of every bite of food we eat and they play an integral role in food production not only in the United States but all around the world. Sadly our honeybees are not doing so well and in recent years...

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The Art of Listening, Trauma – Exposed, Heard, Understood

The Art of Listening, Trauma – Exposed, Heard, Understood

Trauma, the underbelly of our humanity; vulnerable and uncomfortable. “The greatest sources of our suffering are the lies we tell ourselves.” Broaden your understanding of trauma. This class will peer through the lenses of neuroscience, psychology, and the intrinsic natural understanding of Vitalism. Familiarize yourself with the subject in order to be able to greet it with more ease and familiarity when it appears. Sometimes the greatest monster is fear of fear itself. “Trauma results in a fundamental reorganization of the way mind and...

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A Brief Look at Dandelion

A Brief Look at Dandelion

by Peter W. Simon             Look at any hardware store lawn care section, and you’ll see many products proclaiming their effectiveness against Dandelions; and I can recall my father bemoaning their presence on his lawn back in my childhood.  But, despite our cultural perceptions of Dandelion as a weed invading our manicured lawns, its history is quite different indeed.  The sunny little flower most of us are familiar with was most likely brought over from Europe by settlers –  not as a stowaway, but as a food crop. As a...

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